Found out boyfriend is on dating website

The month after the funeral, doctors diagnosed her with breast cancer.A course of radiation and constant appointments left her exhausted, and a bit defeated.What she didn’t yet comprehend was that the situation was not merely a theft of 0,000. Like a number of seniors, she had been targeted—in her case, successfully—by an unscrupulous fraudster who posed as a friend in order to steal her life savings.Her total losses, at that point, actually exceeded

The month after the funeral, doctors diagnosed her with breast cancer.A course of radiation and constant appointments left her exhausted, and a bit defeated.What she didn’t yet comprehend was that the situation was not merely a theft of $200,000. Like a number of seniors, she had been targeted—in her case, successfully—by an unscrupulous fraudster who posed as a friend in order to steal her life savings.Her total losses, at that point, actually exceeded $1 million. Unfortunately, such situations are more common than you think.It felt like a physical punch to the gut, she says.And yet, as everyone sat down onto the table on Thanksgiving, she kept the news, and her rising panic, to herself. In between prepping the turkey and picking up last-minute necessities for the annual family feast—the first without her husband of almost 50 years—a widow in upstate New York, picked up the phone. A wire transfer the widow had made—$203,000, sent earlier that month to a new friend she had met through Match.com—had been flagged as a fraudulent transaction.

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The month after the funeral, doctors diagnosed her with breast cancer.

A course of radiation and constant appointments left her exhausted, and a bit defeated.

What she didn’t yet comprehend was that the situation was not merely a theft of $200,000. Like a number of seniors, she had been targeted—in her case, successfully—by an unscrupulous fraudster who posed as a friend in order to steal her life savings.

Her total losses, at that point, actually exceeded $1 million. Unfortunately, such situations are more common than you think.

It felt like a physical punch to the gut, she says.

And yet, as everyone sat down onto the table on Thanksgiving, she kept the news, and her rising panic, to herself.

million. Unfortunately, such situations are more common than you think.It felt like a physical punch to the gut, she says.And yet, as everyone sat down onto the table on Thanksgiving, she kept the news, and her rising panic, to herself. In between prepping the turkey and picking up last-minute necessities for the annual family feast—the first without her husband of almost 50 years—a widow in upstate New York, picked up the phone. A wire transfer the widow had made—3,000, sent earlier that month to a new friend she had met through Match.com—had been flagged as a fraudulent transaction.

Conversations started small, sharing basic information. He told her that he was younger, and a widower—that his wife had died of cancer two years prior.Her late husband, an electrical engineer who worked for over 40 years with IBM, had died in December 2014 after a six-month medical ordeal, during which a series of complications kept him in the hospital until the very end.And the widow—a retired nurse—soon found herself in a health battle of her own.So, later in October, when Duffey told her that he might be able to help her with her finances, she jumped at the chance.

She told Duffey that she knew her husband had valuable IBM stock, but wasn’t sure the extent of it.

Yet many of these crimes go unreported, or under-reported—largely for the same reason that the widow in this case didn’t want to divulge her name.

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